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About Blooks - Discovering the book as object, Mindell Dubansky (ongoing)

This blog is devoted to the subject of BLOOKS, objects made in the emulation of books, either by hand or commercial manufacture. […]

The transformation of the book is an inescapable theme of contemporary life. As a result of the advancement of computer technology, the book as we have known it is experiencing a major cultural shift and many question the future of the physical book. Simultaneously, we know that there are many kinds of books for which there is no substitute and more than ever, artists, designers, collectors, and librarians are attracted to books for their physical beauty, historical significance, structural properties and emotional currency. Interest in rare books, the book arts, the use of the book in works of art, and book re-purposing is flourishing. Blook-objects have a prominent place in this reinvention of the role of the book, as you will see as this blog develops.

See also: Blook, Wikipedia

via Andrea de Franco

(Source: aboutblooks.blogspot.it)

The book began as a survey consisting of an “ever-evolving” list of questions that the editors sent out to more than 600 women. A small sample: Do you think you have taste or style? Can you say a bit about how your mother’s body and style has been passed down to you? Are there any dressing rules you’d want to convey to other women? Do you ever wish you were a man or could dress like a man or had a man’s body?

The questions are provocative and psychological. They suggest that a closet is an archive of emotion. (As one of the women interviewed puts it, already wise at 28: “We are always asking for something when we get dressed. Asking to be loved, … to be admired, to be left alone, to make people laugh, to scare people, to look wealthy, to say I’m poor, I love myself.”)

The questions also resist the idea, commonly held, that paying too much attention to dress is frivolous. For most of the women interviewed here, dress is a tool they learn to deploy around the same time they are taught to use a knife and fork, and it is just as essential for their social survival. “Women in Clothes” is part advice manual, part anthropological study, part feminist document.

The interviewees are young girls (the youngest is 5), old women (salty and dignified matriarchs), famous women (Kim Gordon, Lena Dunham), religious women, trans women, designers, choreographers (Monica Bill Barnes, on costumes: “As soon as you present yourself as really pretty onstage, you lose a certain amount of power. You’re safer. You’re admired. And then people feel comfortable with you”), artists, Asian garment workers, and even a man or two

It was a great pleasure to visit the Sheldon Museum of Art, in Lincoln, Nebraska, to talk about Significant Objects, in connection with the current Things Speak exhibition. Fellow speakers at the Things Speak symposium were Carrie Heitman, UNL assistant professor of anthropology, and Steve Tamayo, traditional Sicangu artist and storyteller — both were excellent. 

Things Speak: Storied Objects From Lincoln Collections, is an impressive show, running through February 8, 2015. With the possible exception of a car horn shaped like a boa constrictor, from the local Museum of Speed collection, my favorite element of the show was an adjunct project in the museum’s Focus Gallery.

As seen above, it presented several objects from the Sheldon’s own collection and invited viewers to grab a sticky note and write a story — “real or imagined, humorous or series” — and affix it to the wall near the object.

Best of all: At least a couple of visitors took note of the gallery’s thermostat, and chose to write about that! (“This thermostat speaks to me. Right now it’s saying, ‘68’.”)

Always take inspiration where you can find it, right?

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The Political Nature of the Book, Janneke Adema, Gary Hall (2013). Design by Nabaa Baqir, Mila Spasova and Serhan Curti.

This website consists of 3 sections that all offer an alternative way to engage with the article, as well as to access or distribute it. The first section consists of the original postprint article text, which offers a familiar linear reading experience. The second section consists of 28 keywords, which relate to some of the main themes and topics that characterise and structure the article’s content. By clicking on them these offer an alternative non-linear route through the text, as they are connected to snippets of text extracted from the original text that refer to the various keywords. The third section offers an offline engagement, consisting of 7 posters, each with 4 keywords and 4 QR codes that can be printed off at home. […]

Together the website and posters try to envision what a ‘performative publication’ might be. A performative publication wants to explore how we can bring together and align more closely the material form of a publication with its content.

(Source: disruptivemedia.org.uk)

The Thing The Book: A Monument to the Book as Object - Cool Hunting:

Two recognizable contributors are Miranda July and writer Jonathan Lethem, who embraced their specific assignments and took advantage of their physical (and theoretical) limitations.
“I had a kind of deferred, but embarrassed excitement about footnotes. I’d always wanted to do something with them, but they just belonged too completely to Baker and Wallace. So I needed an assignment to free me,” Lethem tells us.
“I just liked the idea of an erratum—meant to correct a mistake—that was itself a mistake,” July says. “And then it was fun to think of what the most egregious correction might be—perhaps an erratum that insisted that perfectly tame text was meant to be pornographic. I don’t know how the author of the original text feels about the ‘swelling clit’ stuffed between pages 44 and 45, I’m sure I’ll meet him at some point and we’ll discuss it.” 

[Lethem, of course, was among our contributors. I also tried July, but never got an answer. :( ]  

The Thing The Book: A Monument to the Book as Object - Cool Hunting:

Two recognizable contributors are Miranda July and writer Jonathan Lethem, who embraced their specific assignments and took advantage of their physical (and theoretical) limitations.

“I had a kind of deferred, but embarrassed excitement about footnotes. I’d always wanted to do something with them, but they just belonged too completely to Baker and Wallace. So I needed an assignment to free me,” Lethem tells us.

“I just liked the idea of an erratum—meant to correct a mistake—that was itself a mistake,” July says. “And then it was fun to think of what the most egregious correction might be—perhaps an erratum that insisted that perfectly tame text was meant to be pornographic. I don’t know how the author of the original text feels about the ‘swelling clit’ stuffed between pages 44 and 45, I’m sure I’ll meet him at some point and we’ll discuss it.”

[Lethem, of course, was among our contributors. I also tried July, but never got an answer. :( ]  

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Forgotten Books (2010? - present)

Welcome to Forgotten Books, the world’s largest online library with 484,473 books available on demand […] More than just books; Forgotten Books also features advanced analytical data. Every single word, page and image inside each and every one of our 484,473 books have been analyzed, indexed and classified. With this valuable research information, we can tell you virtually anything about anything, from the most commonly used word in fiction books published in 1765, to the book with the most images of cats in the first 20 pages. Or perhaps some more useful information, such as a list of every word in the English language in order of usage frequency.

Pictures come from a copy held at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2014

(Source: forgottenbooks.com)

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ZineWiki (2009 - present)

ZineWiki is an open-source encyclopedia devoted to zines and independent media. It covers the history, production, distribution and culture of the small press.

p-dpa:

ZineWiki (2009 - present)

ZineWiki is an open-source encyclopedia devoted to zines and independent media. It covers the history, production, distribution and culture of the small press.

(Source: zinewiki.com)

Tags: Zines

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WhatTheBook, Barbara de Wilde, Tony Chu, Michael Yap, Thomas Hubben, Sana Rao (2013)

WhatTheBook is an interactive poll, a gallery exhibition with a website extension, that was created for the American Institute of Graphic Arts’ final “50 Books/50 Covers” exhibition, an annual exhibition showcasing the best book and book cover design. 

via Piero Molino

(Source: barbaradewilde.com)

(via swissmiss | Birdhouse Bookshelf)

Tags: Bookshelves


The new apartment was still feeling a little empty and un-lived in so Simon and I set about on this fun little project! It took as about 4 days to put it all together but most that time was spent sourcing the materials so if you were smart about it (and know where to get things – unlike us) then you could do it in a day easy.

(via DIY Book Headboard | Design Every Day)

The new apartment was still feeling a little empty and un-lived in so Simon and I set about on this fun little project! It took as about 4 days to put it all together but most that time was spent sourcing the materials so if you were smart about it (and know where to get things – unlike us) then you could do it in a day easy.

(via DIY Book Headboard | Design Every Day)